A high efficiency system burns far less fuel to achieve the same level of warmth and comfort in your home. Not to mention that today’s high efficiency heating systems take up less room and run much more quietly than older systems.

September 24, 2018

What is a “High Efficiency” Heating System?

Keeping your home warm during the winter is something most of us take for granted. Until something goes wrong with your furnace. Or a prolonged cold spell results in a higher than expected heating bill. Then a warm home becomes a priority.

Which is why you should take some time while the weather is still warm to assess the condition of your home’s heating system. Is it more than 10 years old? Did it struggle to your home warm last winter, running longer and burning more fuel oil or gas than necessary? Will you be able to count on it again this year?

If your heating system is nearing the end of its service life, or has become too expensive to operate, now is the perfect time to consider upgrading to a high efficency heating system.

Most homes on Cape Cod use a central furnace to produce heat. Most furnaces work either by blowing heated air through ducts, or by circulating hot water through radiators. The furnace is typically powered by fuel oil, natural gas, propane, or electricity. In a forced air system, air is drawn into the furnace and through a heat exchanger, a metal chamber heated by burning fuel (or electricity). The heated air is then blown through ductwork throughout the home. A forced hot water system works in a similar way, heating water in a boiler and circulating it through radiators located throughout the home.

A certain portion of the heat created can be lost into the atmosphere, through chimneys or vents. Some estimates say that up to 30 percent of fuel burned in an older “atmospheric” system can be wasted. But modern, high efficiency systems can greatly reduce that energy loss.

For example, condensing furnaces (such as those manufactured by Bosch or Viesmann) are designed to reclaim much of the escaping heat by cooling exhaust gases below 140 degrees. This is the temperature at which water vapor condensing into water, which can then be recaptured and recirculated through the heat exchanger. This creates an annual fuel utilization efficiency of up to 95 percent, a 135 percent improvement percent over older systems.

As a result, a high efficiency system burns far less fuel to achieve the same level of warmth and comfort in your home. Not to mention that today’s high efficiency heating systems take up less room and run much more quietly than older systems.

If you are interested in learning more about the benefits of a high efficiency heating system for your home, call us at (508) 388-1009. We’d be happy to do a complimentary assessment of your current heating system and how it might compare to a newer, more efficient system.

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